Russian armed forces started large-scale air defense military drills at Kapustin Yar testing range 0

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Defence & Security News - Russia

 
 
Saturday, March 8, 2014 01:00 PM
 
Russian armed forces started large-scale air defense military drills at Kapustin Yar testing range.
Thursday, March 6, 2014, soldiers of Russia’s Western Military District have started large-scale air defense drills at its southern testing range of Kapustin Yar on the backdrop of further escalation of tensions with the West over Ukraine. The exercise will culminate with live-firing drills, involving S-300, Buk-M1 and other air defense systems.
     
Thursday, March 6, 2014, soldiers of Russia’s Western Military District have started large-scale air defense drills at its southern testing range of Kapustin Yar on the backdrop of further escalation of tensions with the West over Ukraine. The exercise will culminate with live-firing drills, involving S-300, Buk-M1 and other air defense systems.
Live firing of S-300PMU2 air defense missile system somewhere in Russia (Archive image)
     

“It is for the first time that all air defense units from the district, including coastal defenses of the Northern Fleet, have gathered in one place,” said the district’s spokesman, Col. Oleg Kochetkov.

He added that combat crews of air defense systems S-300, Buk-M1, Osa (SA-8 Gecko), Strela-10 (SA-13 Gopher), air defense gun systems Tunguska, mobile air defense systems Igla would participate in the military exercises.

“It is the largest-ever exercise held by air defense units of the Western Military District,” Kochetkov said, adding that the drills were part of a regular combat training cycle.

Around 3,500 specialists of the district’s army air defense systems and more than 1,000 pieces of military and special hardware were participating in the drills, Kochetkov said. Around 30 military trains were used to transfer military hardware from different Russian regions.

The exercise, however, coincides with further escalation of a political crisis in Ukraine that has led to the current standoff between Russia and the West over the fate of Crimea, an autonomous Ukrainian region with a majority ethnic Russian population.

 

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