Discover Russian artillery tactic to destroy Ukrainian M777 howitzers using drones


According to a video published by the Russian Ministry of Defense on June 21, 2022, Russian army artillery units use Zala UAV (Unmanned Aerial Vehicle) to carry out reconnaissance missions and increase the accuracy of fire. In the video, the Zala drone enables Russian artillery to spot Ukrainian army M777 155mm howitzers battery and then destroy them with pinpoint accuracy.
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Russian artillery unit destroys Ukrainian army M777 155mm towed howitzers using a drone to collect data position. (Picture source Screen Russian MoD Video)


In the past artillery units has to use observers deployed on the battlefield to detect targets, but with the use of drones, the detection is increased as well as the precision through the use of onboard GPS systems allowing the detection of enemy positions.

Ukrainian and Russian artillery can now strike targets with extreme precision from indirect long-range fire thanks to the use of drones. Hitting a tank of an artillery position using unguided rockets or artillery rounds is very difficult for a gunner who cannot see his target.

For artillery systems such as rocket launchers or howitzers, the Circular Error Probable (CEP) is typically 25 meters at 24 km, making it difficult to hit a target such as a tank of artillery vehicles or weapons.

In an adjusted fire, an artillery observer notes where the first round lands, then tells the gunner how to adjust their aim. Using drones, artillery units can receive accurate information because they can get in close and observe from directly above the enemy. The video released by the Russian MoD (Ministry of Defense) demonstrates the use of drones in a real combat situation.

In this case, the Zala drone was used to detect the Ukrainian artillery unit using America-made M777 155mm towed howitzers as well as the ammunition truck which were then destroyed by Russian artillery fires



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