SOFEX 2014: US SOCOM showcases its “flying stallion”

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SOFEX 2014 news Show daily report coverage Special Operations Forces Exhibition Conference exhibitors visitors information description Amman Jordan Jordanian army military defense industry technology
 
SOFEX 2014
The Special Operations Forces Exhibition & Conference
Amman
, Jordan
6 - 8 May 2014
 
CV-22 at SOFEX 2014
 
 
Wednesday, May 7, 2014 10:45 PM
 
SOFEX 2014: US SOCOM showcases its “flying stallion”
By Stylianos Kanavakis
The United States Special Operations Command showcases its flying stallion at the SOFEX 2014 exhibition in Amman, Jordan. The CV-22 is being exhibited by the U.S. Air Force SOCOM personnel.

The constant need to deploy special operations troops in many different areas around the globe makes the V-22 Osprey a multi-tool that addresses the time-speed, distance, capacity and landing infrastructure matrix faced by many other platforms.


     
The United States Special Operations Command showcases its flying stallion at the SOFEX 2014 exhibition in Amman, Jordan. The CV-22 is being exhibited by the U.S. Air Force SOCOM personnel.
A closer look at the tilt-rotor platform reveals a few of its characteristics. Special operations infiltration dictates the flight pattern. That is flying low with the cover of dusk. The USAF V-22s, have a few special subsystems in order to carry out their tasks.
     
The United States Special Operations Command showcases its flying stallion at the SOFEX 2014 exhibition in Amman, Jordan. The CV-22 is being exhibited by the U.S. Air Force SOCOM personnel.
The front picture reveals that the platform has an AN/APQ-186 terrain-following multimode radar (top of the nose) and an AN/AAQ-16 Forward-Looking Infra-Red system, both of them by Raytheon.
     
The United States Special Operations Command showcases its flying stallion at the SOFEX 2014 exhibition in Amman, Jordan. The CV-22 is being exhibited by the U.S. Air Force SOCOM personnel.
As seen in the picture, avoiding the ground threats posed by shoulder-launched anti-aircraft systems lead to the integration of the AAR-54 Missile Approach Warning System made by Northrop Grumman (position 1), the ALE-54 countermeasures dispenser by BAE Systems (position 2) and the AN/AAQ-24(V) DIRCM (Directional Infrared Countermeasures) by Northrop Grumman (position 3). An extra antenna is fitted on top of the helicopter for sattelite communications (position 4)
 

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