Skip to main content

US Army wants to launch a competitive program to upgrade light wheeled vehicle Humvee 2901112.


| 2011
a
Defense News - United States
 

Saturday, January 29, 2011, 19:02 PM

 
US Army wants to launch a competitive program to upgrade light wheeled vehicle Humvee.
 
 
The U.S. Army still plans to launch a competitive program to upgrade its Humvee fleet, according to the final draft of the service's Tactical Wheeled Vehicle Strategy, released Jan. 27. But the service has been unsuccessful so far at securing funding for the effort.
     
The U.S. Army still plans to launch a competitive program to upgrade its Humvee fleet, according to the final draft of the service's Tactical Wheeled Vehicle Strategy, released Jan. 27. But the service has been unsuccessful so far at securing funding for the effort.
Upgraded Humvee with armour kit in Afghanistan US Army
     

The Army would like to start the Humvee recap effort this fiscal year, Maj. Gen. Thomas Spoehr, who directs force development in the Army's G-8, told reporters Jan. 27. Getting the effort started will require the Army to submit a second reprogramming request to Congress.

Most vehicle makers had an improved Humvee on display at their booths at the annual Association of the U.S. Army (AUSA) conference in October. The improved Humvee designs featured everything from double-V hulls to advanced armor solutions to structural blast chimneys.

The Army does not plan to buy any new Humvees beyond 2012. However, the service is working with Humvee maker AM General to keep the production line running as long as it makes sense, Bassett said. There are other services' requirements to fill as well as requests from other countries, he said.

The Army plans to reduce its overall fleet of 260,000 trucks by 15 percent by fiscal 2017, Spoehr said. In doing so, the Army will reduce what it spends on procurement for tactical wheeled vehicles from $4.4 billion a year to $2.5 billion a year.

Part of this divestiture could include some of the Army's Mine Resistant Ambush Protected (MRAP) vehicles.

The Army would like to divest around 1,500 of the roughly 20,000 MRAPs in its inventory, Spoehr said. The two models the Army would prefer to divest are the earlier version of the RG-33, built by BAE Systems, and Force Protection's Cougar.

The Army owns later, more capable versions of the RG-33, and to upgrade the older models is not cost-effective, officials said. The Army does not own many Cougars, and therefore, resourcing the maintenance and training for them also is not cost-effective.

 
Copyright © 2019 - 2024 Army Recognition | Webdesign by Zzam

Discover the power of advanced AI with the new Military Equipment Guide App (MEGA) by IDDEA. Instantly recognize and identify military equipment with unparalleled accuracy. Enhance your knowledge and operational efficiency with this cutting-edge tool.

Subscribe now to stay updated and gain exclusive access to expert features!

Join our community today!