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MAG FN Herstal Machine Gun
 
 
MAG FN Herstal machine gun technical data sheet description specifications information intelligence pictures photos images Belgium Belgian Defence industry weapons
 
 
 
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Description 
The FN MAG is a Belgian 7.62 mm general purpose machine gun, designed in the early 1950s at Fabrique Nationale (FN) by Ernest Vervier. It has been used by more than 80 countries, and it has been made under licence in countries such as Argentina, Egypt, India, Singapore, the United Kingdom and the United States. With 200,000 units delivered so far and over 80 countries around the globe adopting it, the MAG™ medium machine gun is definitely a worldwide standard known under various designations: MAG58, GPMG, L7A1 and M240.The FN Mag or M240 (American designation) was adopted by the U.S. Military following a worldwide competition in search of a reliable 7.62x51mm NATO machine gun. With pistol grip, carry handle and fixed buttstock, the M240 B is today’s "go-to" medium machine gun for all branches of the U.S. Armed Services.
 
Variants :
- Model 60-20: machine gun for infantry troops
- Model 60-40: coaxial machine gun for armoured fighting vehicles
- Model 60-30: aircraft variant
 
 
Technical Data 
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Design
The FN MAG is a gas operated, belt fed, air cooled automatic weapon. It uses the long piston stroke gas system with the gas regulator, located below the barrel.The bolt is locked using a swinging shoulder that engages the cut in the floor of the receiver. The air-cooled barrel is quick-detachable, with the carrying handle attached to it to help handling of the hot barrel. The receiver is made from steel stampings.The MAG's receiver is constructed from sheet metal stampings reinforced by steel plates and rivets. The front is reinforced to accept the barrel nut and gas cylinder which are permanently mounted. Guide rails that support the bolt assembly and piston extension during their reciprocating movement are riveted to the side plates. The bolt's guide rails are shaped downward to drive the locking lever into engagement with the locking shoulder, which is also riveted to the side plates. The rear of the receiver has been reinforced and slotted to accept the butt-stock.
Ammunition
All variants of the MAG are fed from disintegrating belts, and are capable of firing most types of 7.62 mm NATO ammunition. All variants of the MAG can use non-disintegrating belts (following replacement of a few easily-swappable parts). The 7.62x51mm NATO is a rifle cartridge developed in the 1950s as a standard for small arms among NATO countries (not to be confused with the similar 7.62x54mmR cartridge). When loaded with a bullet design that expands, tumbles, or fragments in tissue, this cartridge is capable of delivering good terminal performance, including remote wounding effects known as hydrostatic shock.
Combat use
The FN MAG can be found in varying forms for whatever the role may be. These include door-mounted pintle systems for helicopter usage and coaxial placements in tank turrets firing through a solenoid arrangement. The anti-aircraft version offers up ring-and-bead sights. The success of the system can be traced back to its simple design and quality construction. The barrel changing process can be handled with a few short actions by the operator and the barrel itself is constructed heavy enough to offer up sustained fire for periods of time. The reliable belt-feed system works equally well for fixed or disintegrating belts. In the infantry assault role, the weapon can be fitted with a sheet metal container that houses a 50-round belt and is attached to the left side of the receiver.
The FN mag can be also mounted on a tripod that offers a higher degree of accuracy and control than the bipod, for example the FN 360° tripod, which features an elevation adjustment mechanism that enables the weapon's bore axis to be maintained from 300 mm (11.8 in) to 600 mm (23.6 in), has a 30° to +15° elevation change and a 360° traverse range.

Characteristics
The FN Mag machine gun is fitted with a folding bipod that can be adjusted for height. For carrying or use as a forearm, the aluminum legs can be folded back and secured in slots under the receiver by hooks and a spring-loaded catch. When firing from the hip, the bipod legs remain extended and the left leg is gripped for support. The bipod can be removed from the gas cylinder by tapping-out a roll pin in the gas cylinder head until it is flush and the bipod can be rotated enough to clear the gas cylinder's retaining lugs.
The FN MAG is also equipped with a fixed wooden stock, pistol grip, carrying handle and iron sights that consist of a forward blade (adjustable mechanically for both windage and elevation) and a folding leaf rear sight with an aperture in the down position for firing distances from 200 to 800 m in 100 m increments and an open U-notch for ranges from 800 to 1,800 m graduated every 100 m. The rear sight is hinged to a base with protective ears that is integral with the receiver's upper forging.
 
 
Ammunition
- 7.62x51mm NATO
a
Technical Data
Lenght : 1,263 mm
Weight : 11.79 kg
Rate of fire : 650 - 1,000 rds/min
Magazine : rounds Belt
Country users

80 countries in the world

Designer Country
Belgium
Identification
FN Herstal and identification number on the right side of the weapon
Security
Security selector on the pistol grip, secure and firing position.
a
a
Range
Effective: 800 m
Maximum: 1,500 m on tripod
Barrel
Lenght: 630 mm
 
 
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MAG FN Herstal machine gun technical data sheet description specifications information intelligence pictures photos images Belgium Belgian Defence industry weapons
 
MAG FN Herstal machine gun technical data sheet description specifications information intelligence pictures photos images Belgium Belgian Defence industry weapons
MAG FN Herstal machine gun technical data sheet description specifications information intelligence pictures photos images Belgium Belgian Defence industry weapons
 
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