BAE Systems presents the project of Expeditionary Light Tank able to be airdropped by C-130 11310152

 
AUSA 2015 news coverage report show daily visitors exhibitors Annual meeting defense exposition exhibition conference Association United States Army October Washington D.C.
 
AUSA 2015
U.S. Army Annual Meeting & Exposition
12 - 14 October 2015
Washington D.C., United States
 
BAE Systems Expeditionary Light Tank at AUSA 2015
 
 
BAE Systems presents the project of Expeditionary Light Tank able to be airdropped by C-130.
BAE Systems presents a full range of technologies and solutions at the Association of the United States Army (AUSA) Annual Meeting and Exposition in Washington, D.C., October 12-14, 2015, including the project of Expeditionary Light Tank that could be airdropped that could be airdropped.
     
BAE Systems presents a full range of technologies and solutions at the Association of the United States Army (AUSA) Annual Meeting and Exposition in Washington, D.C., October 12-14, 2015, including the project of Expeditionary Light Tank that could be airdropped that could be airdropped. BAE Systems project of Expeditionary Light Tank at AUSA 2015, U.S. Army annual meeting & exposition in Washington D.C., United States.
     
At AUSA 2015, BAE Systems unveils for the first time to the public a nexw a project of expeditionary light tank that could be airdropped from a C-130 aircraft.

The company’s solution is based on the purpose-built M8 Armored Gun System, modernized with mature technologies from the CV90 family of infantry fighting vehicles and the Bradley Fighting Vehicle.

In 2013, airborne units of U.S. Army has requested to have a new light tank with fire power which could be airdropped.

In February 2013, U.S. Army requirements officials at Fort Benning, Ga., are in discussions with the XVIII Airborne Corps at Fort Bragg, N.C., to develop "mobile protected firepower for light airborne infantry," Col. Rocky Kmiecik, director of the Mounted Requirements Division at the Army's Maneuver Center of Excellence
     
BAE Systems presents a full range of technologies and solutions at the Association of the United States Army (AUSA) Annual Meeting and Exposition in Washington, D.C., October 12-14, 2015, including the project of Expeditionary Light Tank that could be airdropped that could be airdropped.
     
The M8 Armored Gun System is a light tank that was intended to replace the M551 Sheridan in the 82nd Airborne Division, as well as being expected to replace TOW-equipped Humvees in the 2d Armored Cavalry Regiment (2nd ACR).

In the 1980s, the United States Army began looking for a replacement for their M551 Sheridan light tanks. Several attempts over the years to update or replace the Sheridan had proved unsuccessful. The Armored Gun System (AGS) competition was initiated and in 1992 FMC/United Defense's vehicle was selected.

In addition to being expected to replace the Sheridan in the 82nd Airborne Division, it was expected to replace TOW-equipped Humvees in the 2d Armored Cavalry Regiment.

The M8 was armed with the M35 rifled autoloading 105 mm cannon main gun with an M240 7.62 mm machine-gun mounted co-axially. The M35 has a rate of fire of approximately 12 rounds per minute, with a ready capacity of 21 rounds with 9 more in stowage. Power is provided by a Detroit Diesel 6V-92TIA diesel developing 580 hp.

The M8 project was canceled in 1997 to free up money for other fledgling programs.
     
     
In the past, the 82nd Airborne Division was equipped with the M551 Sheridan Armored Reconnaissance Airborne Assault Vehicle until the mid 1990s. Developed during the Vietnam War, the Sheridan resembled a light tank and featured a 152mm main gun capable of firing standard ammunition or the MGM-51 Shillelagh antitank missile.

The Sheridan was used in the Invasion of Panama in 1989 and Operation Desert Shield/Storm in 1991, but it was considered ineffective since its lightweight, aluminum armor was thin enough to be pierced by heavy machine-gun rounds, and the vehicle was particularly vulnerable to mines.
     
In the past, the 82nd Airborne Division was equipped with the M551 Sheridan Armored Reconnaissance Airborne Assault Vehicle until the mid 1990s. Developed during the Vietnam War, the Sheridan resembled a light tank and featured a 152mm main gun capable of firing standard ammunition or the MGM-51 Shillelagh antitank missile. M551 Sheridan Light tank preparing to be forward deployed for a live fire exercise in Saudi Arabia during Operation Desert Shield in December 1990.
 

 

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