BAE Systems contract from US Army for technical support on M88A1 M88A2 recovery armoured 10404172

Defense & Security Industry News - BAE Systems
 
BAE Systems contract from US Army for technical support on M88A1 M88A2 recovery armoured.
BAE Systems has received a contract worth up to $112 million from the U.S. Army to perform technical support and sustainment of M88 recovery vehicles. The contract, awarded by the Army’s TACOM Life Cycle Management Command, is for ongoing service and improvements to BAE Systems-built M88A1 and M88A2 recovery vehicles over the next four years.
     
BAE Systems has received a contract worth up to $112 million from the U.S. Army to perform technical support and sustainment of M88 recovery vehicles. The contract, awarded by the Army’s TACOM Life Cycle Management Command, is for ongoing service and improvements to BAE Systems-built M88A1 and M88A2 recovery vehicles over the next four years.
United States Army M88A1 armoured recovery vehicle
     
“The M88 is critical to the military’s recovery missions of the heaviest vehicles in the fleet,” said John G. Tile, director of Recovery Vehicles at BAE Systems. “Whether our vehicles are coming off the assembly line or deployed in theatre, we are committed to providing the highest quality vehicle and full life-cycle support of the M88. This award continues the long standing relationship of program management, engineering, logistics, and field service support to the Army and other customers of the M88 program.”

The M88 vehicle provides recovery support to troops in the field, and is the only vehicle able to recover the M1 Abrams tank and all of the vehicles required to maneuver with the Armored Brigade Combat Team during battle. Under the contract, called Systems Technical Support and Sustainment Systems Technical Support, services and products will be delivered to the Army, the U.S. Marine Corps, and Foreign Military Sales customers in support of their 70-plus ton combat vehicle recovery requirements.

Work on the program will be performed by the current workforce at the company’s facilities in San Jose, California; York, Pennsylvania; and Sterling Heights, Michigan; as well as by field service representatives stationed at military facilities across the globe.

The M88A1 is an upgraded version of the M88 fitted with a diesel engine. It also had a modified transmission, a diesel-fired personnel heater and auxiliary power unit. The M88A1 Medium Recovery Vehicle (MRV) is a full tracked armored vehicle used to perform recovery missions on the battlefield.

The M88A1 is a recovery vehicle derived from M60 Main Battle Tank. Its primary mission was to perform recovery missions for M60-equipped units. M88A1 is capable of recovering 50-ton main battle tanks.
     
BAE Systems has received a contract worth up to $112 million from the U.S. Army to perform technical support and sustainment of M88 recovery vehicles. The contract, awarded by the Army’s TACOM Life Cycle Management Command, is for ongoing service and improvements to BAE Systems-built M88A1 and M88A2 recovery vehicles over the next four years.
United States Army M88A2 armoured recovery vehicle (Photo U.S. MoD)
     
The M88A2 HERCULES (Heavy Equipment Recovery Combat Utility Lift and Evacuation System) is an improved version of the M-88 and M88A1 heavy armoured recovery vehicle. The M88A2 HERCULES is the successor vehicle to the M88A1, which had only a recovery capability of 56 tons.

M88A2 HERCULES features overlay armour protection, ballistic skirts and NBC face mask protection. The vehicle uses passive spaced armour for the hull, providing ballistic protection against up to 30 mm calibre direct fire and 152 mm indirect fire fragmentation.

The M88a2 HERCULES has a longer 35-ton boom, a 63,504 kg constant pull main winch with 85 m of cable and an auxiliary 3-ton winch to aid main winch cable deployment. The main winch on the M88A2 is capable of a 70-ton, singleline recovery, allowing the M88A2 HERCULES to provide recovery of the 70- ton M1A2 Abrams tank.
 

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