Surf transit testing for new ACV Amphibious Combat Vehicle by US Marines


U.S. Marines with Amphibious Vehicle Test Branch, Marine Corps Tactical Systems Support Activity, drive new Amphibious Combat Vehicles (ACV) along the beach during low-light surf transit testing at AVTB Beach on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, December 18, 2019.


Surf transit testing for new ACV Amphibious Combat Vehicle by US Marines 925 001
U.S. Marines with Amphibious Vehicle Test Branch, Marine Corps Tactical Systems Support Activity, test Amphibious Combat Vehicles along the beach during low-light surf transit testing at AVTB Beach on Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, California, Dec. 16, 2019. (Picture source U.S. DoD)


The test was designed to assess and verify how well Marines can interface with the vehicle and operate at night. The ACV is an eight-wheeled armored personnel carrier designed to fully replace the Corps’ aging fleet of Amphibious Assault Vehicles.

In 2015, after the USMC issued a Request for Proposal for the ACV program, BAE Systems was awarded one of two Engineering, Manufacturing, and Development (EMD) contracts to produce 16 prototype ACV vehicles with a teammate Iveco Defence Vehicles. At the time of the award, our solution had already undergone extensive testing including water and land mobility, ship launch and recovery, and survivability.

In December 2016, BAE Systems rolled out the first of the 16 prototypes to the USMC ahead of schedule. This significant milestone for both our company and our Marine Corps customer was honored during a ceremony held at our York, Pennsylvania manufacturing facility. Several BAE Systems’ facilities contributed to the development and manufacturing of the 16 ACV prototypes, some of the facilities include Aiken, South Carolina; Anniston, Alabama, Quantico, Virginia; San Jose, California; and York, Pennsylvania.

BAE Systems’ ACV 1.1 is equipped with a robust 700HP engine, providing a significant power increase over the Assault Amphibious Vehicle currently operated by the Marine Corps. It has a range of more than 325 miles (53 km) on land before refueling and can travel at speeds in excess of 65 miles (105 km/h) per hour. Both sea and land performance are important capabilities for the Marines as they want to execute their missions quickly and effectively.

The ACV vehicle excels in all-terrain mobility and has a suspended interior seat structure for 13 embarked Marines, blast protected positions for an additional crew of three, and improved survivability and force protection over currently fielded systems.



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