Lebanon armed forces try to make its modernization with second hands military equipment 2811111

a
 
 
SMES 2011 Online Show Daily News
International Defence & Security Middle East Show Exhibition
Beirut
, Lebanon
28 - 30 November 2011
 
Lebanon army at SMES 2011
 
 
Monday, November 28, 2011, 04:46 PM
 
Lebanon armed forces try to make its modernization with second hands military equipment.
At SMES 2011, defence and security Middle East exhibition in Beyrouth, the Lebanon armed forces present its latest acquisition of second hands military equipment and armoured vehicles, as the AIFV (Armoured Infantry fighting vehicle) offered by Belgium.
     
At SMES 2011, defence and security Middle East exhibition, the Lebanon armed forces present its latest acquisition of second hands military equipment and armoured vehicles, as the AIFV (Armoured Infantry fighting vehicle) offered by Belgium.
Second hand Armoured Infantry Fighting Vehicle AIFV with 25mm gun are now in service in the Lebanon Armed Forces (Pictures Army Recognition Copyright at SMES 2011)
     
In September 2007 , Lebanon ordered 40 Leopard 1A5 main battle tanks and 32 AIFV armored infantry fighting vehicles with 25mm guns and spare parts that were “offered by Belgium at a bargain price”.

In November 2010, Russian announced an unconditional gift of arms and military supplies to strengthen the Lebanese army. The gift will include six Mi-24 attack helicopters, 31 T-72 tanks, 36 130-millimeter artillery pieces and 500,000 shells.

The money will come from what remains of the $100 million donated by Saudi Arabia in June to help the military crush an al-Qaida-affiliated terrorist group called Fatah Al-Islam in northern Lebanon.

The Lebanon Air Force is still looking for fighter jets — perhaps Jordanian or Saudi F-5E/Fs — to replace five old Hawker Hunters that have been grounded for years by a lack of spare parts.

“There are a number of old but fairly good jet fighters available in the market that the LEbanon air Force could get for either free or very low prices, but the problem is that the best offers are American-built, which means Washington would need to give its approval for the transfer to Lebanon, and that is a problem now,” one Lebanese Air Force officer said.

The Lebanese Armed Forces' primary missions include defending Lebanon and its citizens against external aggression, maintaining internal stability and security, confronting threats against the country's vital interests, engaging in social development activities and undertaking relief operations in coordination with public and humanitarian institutions.

 
 

This website uses cookies to manage authentication, navigation, and other functions. By using our website, you agree that we can place these types of cookies on your device.