Russia has new idea of railway armed with ballistic missile with higher technological level 12709152

Defence & Security News - Russia
 
Russia has new idea of railway armed with ballistic missile with higher technological level.
Russia is ready to come back with the idea of railway armed with ballistic missile but on a higher technological level which will make them even more untraceable now. Russia’s Strategic Missile Forces are preparing to revive railroad-based missiles and counter the US’s Conventional Prompt Global Strike concept.
     
Russia is ready to come back with the idea of railway armed with ballistic missile but on a higher technological level which will make them even more untraceable now. Russia’s Strategic Missile Forces are preparing to revive railroad-based missiles and counter the US’s Conventional Prompt Global Strike concept. The RT-23 (NATO reporting name SS-24 Scalpel) on railway was a Soviet ICBM (InterContinental Ballistic Missile) developed and produced before 1991 by the Yuzhnoye Design Bureau In Dnipropetrovsk, Soviet Ukraine.
     
A blueprint of the modernized “nuclear train” was presented in the first half of 2014.The Soviet Union decided to produce combat railway missile complexes (BZhRKs) with ballistic missiles in 1969 in response to the US' powerful system of nuclear-capable submarines.

“A Defense Ministry report has been submitted to the president and the order has been given to develop a preliminary design of a rail-mounted missile system,” the commander of the Strategic Missile Force, Lt. Gen. Sergey Karakayev, said in December 2013.

General Karakayev compared a potential power of a “nuclear train” with several missiles to a division of stationery silo-based intercontinental ballistic missiles.

In the past, Soviet Union operated 12 BZhRKs with three missile launchers each, and it was an efficient and intimidating solution. The vehicles travelled across the system of railroads on the country's vast territory and closely resembled ordinary cargo trains, bringing to naught the capabilities of satellite surveillance.

The railway missile system was decommissioned in 2015, but now after ten years, Russia is ready to relaunch the idea.

Within the framework of the START-II nuclear arms reduction treaty with the US, signed by President Boris Yeltsin and his US counterpart, George H. W. Bush in 1993, the SS-24 Scalpel system was decommissioned and all launching platforms were destroyed by 2007.

Russia’s Defense Ministry announced the new railroad missile system would be developed by the Moscow Institute of Thermal Technology – the same institute that developed the sea-based Bulava nuclear missile for the latest generation of Borey-class submarine strategic nuclear missile carriers.
 

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