Some Arab countries are ready to support an Arab peacekeeping force in Syria 2709123

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Defense News - Syria

 
 
Thursday, September 27, 2012, 12:44 AM
 
Some Arab countries are ready to support an Arab peacekeeping force in Syria.
The US and Russia have offered starkly differing assessments of the situation in Syria at the UN Security Council session, underscoring the global body's inability to unite around a strategy to end the civil war in the Arab country. Arab ministers have met with UN-Arab League envoy Lakhdar Brahimi on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly, and Tunisia's President Moncef Marzouki said later his country could support an Arab peacekeeping force in Syria.
     
The US and Russia have offered starkly differing assessments of the situation in Syria at the UN Security Council session, underscoring the global body's inability to unite around a strategy to end the civil war in the Arab country. Arab ministers have met with UN-Arab League envoy Lakhdar Brahimi on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly, and Tunisia's President Moncef Marzouki said later his country could support an Arab peacekeeping force in Syria.
UN-Arab League envoy Lakhdar Brahimi
     

"A peacekeeping operation by Arab nations is something we could well imagine," Marzouki told AFP, calling President Bashar al-Assad "a bloodthirsty dictator."

"We have really pushed for a peaceful solution, but if it is necessary, it must be an Arab peacekeeping force, yes."

On Tuesday, the emir of Qatar called at the UN General Assembly for an Arab intervention in Syria.

Arab League secretary general Nabil al-Arabi told reporters he did not believe the emir intended a "fighting force."

But he told a Security Council meeting on the Middle East that the council must support Brahimi by making its resolutions on Syria "binding on all parties".

Russia and China have used their powers as permanent members of the council three times to block resolutions which could have led to potential sanctions.

Western diplomats say they do not expect Russia, Syria's main ally, to weaken its defence of Assad. But they say China, which does not have the same strategic interests, may now be feeling pressure from Arab and other nations over its position.

 

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