Australian F-18 Super Hornet fighter & Special Forces troops deployed in Iraq to fight IS militants

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Defence & Security News - Australia

 
 
Tuesday, October 7, 2014 08:47 AM
 
Australian F-18 Super Hornet fighter and Special Forces troops deployed in Iraq to fight IS militants.
Two Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) F/A-18F Super Hornet aircraft have completed their first armed combat mission over Iraq, assisting coalition operations against Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). Australian special forces will be also deployed on the ground in Iraq, helping local troops as they face the grinding task of driving Islamic State fighters out of their stronghold towns and cities.
     
Two Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) F/A-18F Super Hornet aircraft have completed their first armed combat mission over Iraq, assisting coalition operations against Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL). Australian special forces will be also deployed on the ground in Iraq, helping local troops as they face the grinding task of driving Islamic State fighters out of their stronghold towns and cities.
Two Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) F/A-18F Super Hornet aircraft conduct air to air refuelling with a RAAF KC-30A Multi Role Tanker Transport aircraft by night over the skies of Iraq.
     
The Australian F-18 Super Hornet aircraft, conducted an Air Interdiction and Close Air Support mission over northern Iraq overnight AEDT (5-6 October 2014). The Australian Air Task Group’s KC-30A multi-role tanker transport supported the Super Hornets while the E-7A Wedgetail Airborne Early Warning and Control aircraft also flew over Iraq.

The Australian Air Task Group is operating as part of an Iraqi Government-approved and US-led international coalition assembled to disrupt and degrade ISIL.

Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott is expected to announce on Tuesday that the final legal hurdles with the Iraqi government have been cleared, meaning the Australian commandos can begin their "advise and assist" work with the Iraqis.

Up to 200 Australian special forces soldiers will work in Iraq, bolstering the local troops on the ground. It is understood that some left Al Minhad air base in the United Arab Emirates before the final legal clearance, to begin work.

The Australian government needed a detailed legal agreement with the new government in Baghdad that ensures Australian Defence Force personnel have the necessary legal cover if, for instance, they are involved in the deaths of civilians.

 

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