Up to 10,000 British soldiers could be deployed in UK to prevent terrorist attacks 12411152

Defence & Security News - United Kingdom
 
Up to 10,000 British soldiers could be deployed in UK to prevent terrorist attacks.
Up to 10,000 troops could be deployed in the UK in the event of a Paris terrorist attack, David Cameron has said, as he announced £12bn extra defence spending. It comes after he held talks with French President Francois Hollande following the 13 November attacks in Paris, carried out by so-called Islamic State (IS) militants, which left 130 people dead.
     
Up to 10,000 troops could be deployed in the UK in the event of a Paris-style attack, David Cameron has said, as he announced £12bn extra defence spending. It comes after he held talks with French President Francois Hollande following the 13 November attacks in Paris, carried out by so-called Islamic State (IS) militants, which left 130 people dead. Pictured, members of Kilo Company 42 Commando Royal Marines takes part in Exercise Bold Alligator on Bodmin Moor.
     
Setting out the government's Strategic Defence and Security Review (SDSR), Mr Cameron announced plans for investment in two 5,000-strong "strike brigades", additional F-35 jets, maritime patrol aircraft and high-altitude drones.

“This is vital at a time when the threats to our country are growing. From the rise of ISIL Islamic State and greater instability in the Middle East, to the crisis in Ukraine, the threat of cyberattacks and the risk of pandemics, the world is more dangerous and uncertain today than five years ago,” David Cameron said , according to advanced extracts provided by his office.

Mr. Cameron is due to meet French President François Hollande on Monday morning to discuss counterterrorism cooperation and the fight against Islamic State. Later in the week, the prime minister is due to urge the U.K. parliament to approve extending the Royal Air Force’s bombing campaign against Islamic State to Syria from Iraq where it has been bombing the group for more than a year, although Mr. Cameron and other senior ministers have said the government won’t hold a vote on the issue until it is confident it has the support of lawmakers.

The British prime minister has argued that the U.K. faces a direct and growing threat from Islamic State that it needs to deal with not just in Iraq, but also in Syria, where the group is based. While the U.K. is already supporting allies conducting strikes against Syria by providing intelligence and surveillance, it should be doing more and shouldn’t expect others to carry the risk of protecting Britain, he has said.
 

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