Latvia will receive Stinger MANPADS missile purchased from Denmark


According to the Baltic Times newspaper website, Latvia will receive Stinger Man-portable air-defense missile systems (MANPADS) purchased from Denmark. The planned deal is expected to be completed in the first half of 2018 when air defense systems will arrive in Latvia.


Latvia will receive Stinger MANPADS missile purchased from Denmark 925 001
U.S. Army soldiers prepare to fire a FIM-92 Stinger during a training exercise, Hohenfels, Germany, April 25, 2018. (Picture source U.S. MoD)


In August 2017, Latvian Ministry of Defence and Danish Ministry of Defence have signed an agreement for the purchase of Stinger air defence systems which are in service with the Danish armed forces. Latvia would like to boost its air defense capabilities, a top priority for its defence forces.

The Stinger air defense missile will be delivered to many military units of Latvia including the National Guard. According to the deal for acquisition of Stinger air-defence systems, Latvia will receive missiles together with launch systems. Along with purchase of the Stinger air-defence systems, Latvia is also working on acquisition of the necessary, support, maintenance and training equipment. Armed forces of NATO countries and other allies are helping Latvia with experience and personnel training required to operate the systems.

The FIM-92 Stinger is a man-portable surface-to-air missile system (MANPADS) which was designed and manufactured by the American Company Raytheon. Developed in the United States, it entered service in 1981 and is used by the militaries of the United States and by 29 other countries.

The "fire-and-forget" Stinger FIM-92 missile employs a passive infrared seeker to home in on its airborne target. A passive infrared seeker emits no radiation that a target aircraft can detect, and, instead, guides on the infrared energy (heat) emitted by the target. The Stinger missile itself has an outward targeting range of up to 4,800 m (15,700 feet) and can engage low altitude enemy threats at up to 3,800m (12,500 feet).


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