Iran ready to unveil new air defense missile systems in the near future 1403132

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Defence News - Iran

 
 
Thursday, March 14, 2013, 10:22 AM
 
Iran ready to unveil new air defense missile systems in the near future.
The Iranian Army's Deputy Top Liaison, General Mohammad Hossein Dadras, stressed that Iran enjoys the ability to supply the country's Armed Forces with their needed military tools and equipment without foreign assistance, and added that the country plans to unveil new air defense systems in the near future.
     
The Iranian Army's Deputy Top Liaison, General Mohammad Hossein Dadras, stressed that Iran enjoys the ability to supply the country's Armed Forces with their needed military tools and equipment without foreign assistance, and added that the country plans to unveil new air defense systems in the near future.
Iranian coast-to-sea cruise missile Qader (Capable) is seen being launched.
     

The official noted that the Islamic Republic has achieved self-sufficiency in various military industries, so that it indigenously produces vessels, aircraft, radars and ammunitions without any need to foreign imports.

Dadras also announced that a major radar system will soon be unveiled.

Despite its vast geographical area, Iran is capable of detecting drones with "small cross-section on radar," Dadras pointed out, stressing that the country has no concern in the field of air defense as its skies are fully controlled by the armed forces.

On Tuesday, a senior Iranian commander announced that Iran plans to boost its air-defense capability with new types of radar systems, including satellite detecting radars.

Speaking to reporters here in Tehran, Commander of Khatam ol-Anbia Air Defense Base Brigadier General Farzad Esmayeeli said Iran has equipped its air-defense units with Qader, Mersad, Ya Zahra 3, Misaq 2 and strategic independent S-200 air defense missiles in the current Iranian year (March 20, 2012-March 20, 2013).

"As regards our radar systems, we started using Samen, Shahab and Matla radar systems (this year) and we hope to start deploying and using Arash radars as well as strategic space (satellite detecting) Sepehr radars next (Iranian) year (March 21, 2013 - March 20, 2014)," Esmayeeli added.

In February, Iranian Defense Minister Brigadier General Ahmad Vahidi said that Iran plans to develop different types of radar systems with satellite detecting capabilities.

Addressing the second conference on radar technology systems here in Tehran at the time, Vahidi said Iran has witnessed "a jump" in the field of radar designing and manufacturing.

     
"As regards our radar systems, we started using Samen, Shahab and Matla radar systems (this year) and we hope to start deploying and using Arash radars as well as strategic space (satellite detecting) Sepehr radars next (Iranian) year (March 21, 2013 - March 20, 2014)," Esmayeeli added.
Radar network of Iran air defense units has proven capable of detecting and tracking stealth aircraft and unmanned aerial vehicles.
     

"Today, we have many achievements in different fields. Radars covering ranges of 500km to 700km have been manufactured and production of radar systems with 1,000km to 3,000km of range is underway," Vahidi explained.

He added that Iran is trying to develop radar systems to detect satellites, and said to do so, the radar systems are connected in phased arrangements to cover very long ranges and detect and track satellites.

Iranian officials have announced that the country has now reached self-sufficiency in producing radar systems in different frequencies and for various ranges.

Iran has also taken wide strides in designing and manufacturing different types of light, semi-heavy and heavy weapons, military tools and equipment. Tehran launched an arms development program during the 1980-88 Iraqi imposed war on Iran to compensate for a US weapons embargo. Since 1992, Iran has produced its own tanks, armored personnel carriers, missiles and fighter planes.

Yet, Iranian officials have always stressed that the country's military and arms programs serve defensive purposes and should not be perceived as a threat to any other country.

 

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