Russia has decided to stop delivered of weapons to Syria so long the situation is unstable 1007122

a
 

Defense News - Russia

 
 
Tuesday, July 10, 2012, 10:06 AM
 
Russia has decided to stop delivered of weapons to Syria so long the situation is unstable.
Russia will not deliver new weapons to Syria so long as the situation in that country is unstable, an official at the body in charge of monitoring Russia's arms trade said Monday, July 9, 2012, state media reported. "Russia, as well as other countries, is concerned by the situation in Syria," said Vyacheslav Dzirkaln, deputy head of the Federal Service for Military-Technical Cooperation, RIA Novosti reported. "We are not talking about new arms supplies to that country."
     
Russia will not deliver new weapons to Syria so long as the situation in that country is unstable, an official at the body in charge of monitoring Russia's arms trade said Monday, July 9, 2012, state media reported. "Russia, as well as other countries, is concerned by the situation in Syria," said Vyacheslav Dzirkaln, deputy head of the Federal Service for Military-Technical Cooperation, RIA Novosti reported. "We are not talking about new arms supplies to that country."
Russia has signed a $550 million contract for the delivery of three dozen of Yak-130 trainer fighter aircraft.
     

He specifically said Russia would not supply Syria with Yak-130 aircraft. Russia has signed a $550 million contract for the delivery of three dozen such planes, RIA Novosti said.

Still, it was not clear whether the official was saying Russia would discontinue the delivery of all arms, or whether it was stopping just the supply of "new weapons." The report seemed to leave open the possibility that Russia could continue to deliver some arms to Syria under existing contracts.

The move could be a major blow to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad, who is fighting to stay in control after more than a year of popular protests and a brutal government crackdown.

Russia has been the long-time principal supplier of arms to Syria since the days when it was the Soviet Union. The weapons sales have more than doubled in recent years. According to Congressional Research Service, Russia sold Syria $4.7 billion in arms from 2007 to 2010, compared with $2.1 billion from 2003 to 2006.

Also last month, a shipment of refurbished Russian helicopters headed for Syria had to turn around and return to Russia after its British insurance company dropped coverage on the ship carrying the helicopters.

News of the suspended shipments comes the same day the joint U.N.-Arab League envoy to Syria said al-Assad has agreed on "an approach" to ending the bloodshed in Syria.

 

This website uses cookies to manage authentication, navigation, and other functions. By using our website, you agree that we can place these types of cookies on your device.