Catapult Mk-II 130mm tracked self-propelled howitzer based on Arjun Mk-I tank unveiled Defexpo 10021

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Defexpo 2014
Online Show Daily News
Land, naval, & Internal Homeland Security Systems Exhibition

6 - 9 February 2014
New Delhi, India
 
DRDO Arjun Catapult howitzer at Defexpo 2014
 
 
Monday, February 10, 2014 11:40 AM
 
Catapult Mk-II 130mm tracked self-propelled howitzer based on Arjun Mk-I tank unveiled at Defexpo.
The Defence Research and Development Organisation's (DRDO's) of India unveils its Catapult Mk II tracked self-propelled howitzer mounted on the Arjun Mk I Main Battle Tank (MBT) chassis at Defexpo 2014, defense exhibition in New Delhi, India.
     
The Defence Research and Development Organisation's (DRDO's) of India unveils its Catapult Mk II tracked self-propelled howitzer mounted on the Arjun Mk I Main Battle Tank (MBT) chassis at Defexpo 2014, defense exhibition in New Delhi, India.
The Indian-made Catapult Mk-II 130mm tracked self-propelled howitzer based on the Arjun Mk-I main battle tank at Defexpo 2014, defense exhibition in New Delhi, India.
     

The first version of the Catapult howitzer was based on the Vijayanta MBT chassis. The Vijayanta main battle tank was built in India based on a licensed design of the British main battle tank Vickers Mk.1.

The latest information available indicates that a total of 170 Catapult Mk I systems were built of which 100 are in service with the Indian army and the remainder are in reserve. The latest variant is fitted with a horizontal shield over the gun and crew compartments to provide protection against top attack weapons.

According to DRDO sources, the first trial tests of the Catapult Mk-II were performed in 2012. The Indian Army plans to perform other tests in March-April 2014 with military personnel and engineers of DRDO. If these trial tests are successful, the Indian army could purchase a total of 40 Catapult Mk-II to equip tow artillery regiments.

Designed by integrating the 130 mm M-46 Gun with the Arjun MBT chassis, the Arjun Catapult will fulfill the immediate requirements of Self Propelled (SP) Artillery of the Indian Army for employment in mechanized operations. The technological worth of the equipment stems from the proven Arjun MBT Chassis and Automotive System as well as the time-tested gunnery merits of the 130 mm M-46 Gun. It thereby translates into a highly reliable hybrid SP gun system that offers enormous firepower potency coupled with excellent mobility characteristics while maintaining substantial levels of protection.

     
The Defence Research and Development Organisation's (DRDO's) of India unveils its Catapult Mk II tracked self-propelled howitzer mounted on the Arjun Mk I Main Battle Tank (MBT) chassis at Defexpo 2014, defense exhibition in New Delhi, India.
     
The Russian-made 130 mm M-46 rifled gun barrel is mainly used to engage targets in indirect fire to a maximum range of 27.4 km. The gun can also be fired directly on targets up to 1.4 km range. It can be fired at various angles of elevation from -2° to + 45° and 14° traverse on either side.

The armour of the Catapult Mk-II provides a protection STANAG Level II for the crew from top attack as well as the sides. Careful dimensioning of the walls through optimal slopes and angles has been ensured. It also has an Integrated Fire Detection and Suppression System.

As the Catapult Mk1, the Mk-II version is equipped with a top armour shield to protect the crew and the gun against air threats and shell splinters.

The Catapult Mk-II has a total crew of 8 soldiers. These howitzer can run a ta a maximum road speed of 70 km/h with a maximum cruising range of 400 km. It carries a total of 35 HE shells and cartridges.

 

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