For the first time in the U.S. military history two women will be graduate from Ranger School 12008152

Defence & Security News - United States
 
For the first time in the U.S. military history two women will be graduate from Ranger School.
For the first time in U.S. military history, two women will graduate from the excruciating 62-day Ranger School at Fort Benning. Capt. Kristen Griest and 1st Lt. Shaye Haver will become the first female soldiers ever to graduate from Ranger School on August 21, 2015.
     
For the first time in U.S. military history, two women will graduate from the excruciating 62-day Ranger School at Fort Benning. Capt. Kristen Griest and 1st Lt. Shaye Haver will become the first female soldiers ever to graduate from Ranger School on August 21, 2015. Capt. Kristen Griest, left, and 1st Lt. Shaye Haver will become the first female soldiers ever to graduate from Ranger School on August 21, 2015.
     

This week, Capt. Kristen Griest, 26, and 1st Lt. Shaye Haver, 25, will be awarded the prestigious black and gold Ranger tab along with 94 of their male counterparts.

Ranger candidates arrive for training in the best shape of their lives and survive on a meal a day and just a few hours of sleep — all the while completing some of the toughest military training in the world.

Each year approximately 4,000 students attend Ranger School. Sixty percent of those candidates wash out of the course.

On April 20, West Point graduates Griest and Haver entered into the first gender-integrated Ranger School, alongside 380 men and 18 other female candidates.

Griest, a military police officer from Connecticut and Haver, an Apache helicopter pilot from Texas, completed the full Ranger course in four months.

The US Army divides the grueling course into three phases: "Benning," "mountain," and "Florida."

During the Benning phase of Ranger School, which takes place in Georgia, a soldier's physical stamina, mental toughness, and tactical skills are evaluated and fine-tuned.

On the last day of the Benning phase, Ranger candidates conduct an arduous 12-mile march while carrying a 35-pound ruck sack — and without the luxury of drinking water. About 50% of students will pass this phase of the course, according to the Ranger School website.

The Pentagon is scheduled to make a decision on which combat roles will be opened to women later this year.
 

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