The Missile power of North Korea able to strike South Korea but also United States 1705131

a
 

Missile power of North Korea

 
 
Friday, May 17, 2013, 10:00 AM
 
The Missile power of North Korea able to strike South Korea but also United States.
North Korea is believed to have more than 1,000 missiles of varying capabilities, including long-range missiles which could one day strike the US. Pyongyang's programme has progressed over the last few decades from tactical artillery rockets in the 1960s and 70s to short­-range and medium-range ballistic missiles in the 1980s and 90s. Systems capable of greater ranges are understood to be under research and development.
     
North Korea is believed to have more than 1,000 missiles of varying capabilities, including long-range missiles which could one day strike the US. Pyongyang's programme has progressed over the last few decades from tactical artillery rockets in the 1960s and 70s to short­-range and medium-range ballistic missiles in the 1980s and 90s. Systems capable of greater ranges are understood to be under research and development.
     

South Korea’s state-run Korea Institute for Defense Analyses (KIDA) said that in line with a report submitted to the US Congress by the Pentagon, North Korea has probably accumulated up to 200 so-called transporter erector launchers (TEL), including up to 100 for short-range Scud missiles, 50 for medium-range Nodong missiles and 50 for long-range Musudan missiles, the Yonhap news agency reported.

Previously Seoul estimated that the reclusive communist state, known officially as the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK), appeared to possess no more than 94 mobile launchers.

“The US report shows that North Korea is bent on expanding its missile program despite its continued economic difficulties. It is especially focused on certain asymmetric areas that can pose a threat to South Korea and US forces stationed in the South,” KIDA researcher Kim Sung-kurl said as quoted by Yonhap.

Tensions have risen sharply on the Korean Peninsula since December, when North Korea tested a long-range Taepodong 2 missile, followed in February 2013 by its third nuclear test.

The UN responded with sanctions. The start of recent joint military exercises between South Korea and the United States further irritated the North, which threatened to carry out a nuclear attack on the US mainland, as well as on US forces in the region.

The missile power of North Korea includes:

North Korea missile power includes a variety of short-range missiles, such as the KN-02, which can reach up to 120km and could target military installations in neighbouring South Korea. The Hwasong-5 and Hwasong-6, also known as Scud-B and C, have longer ranges of 300km and 500km respectively. These missiles can deliver conventional warheads, but may also have biological, chemical and nuclear capabilities.

The Hwasong-5 and 6 have both been tested and deployed, defence experts believe, and would enable North Korea to strike any area in South Korea. The Hwasong-6 has also been sold to Iran, where it is known as the Shehab 2.

Hwasong-5:

The Hwasong-5 is a surface-to-surface short-range tactical ballistic missile derived from the Soviet R-17 Elbrus missile and based on the Russian-made ballistic missile Scud-B.

Hwasong-6:

The Hwasong-6 is a tactical ballistic missile manufactured by the defence industry of North Korea. The first of three successful test firings of the Hwasong-6 was reported to have been completed in June 1990. This missile is based on the technology of Russian-made Scud-C.

Hwasong-13:

This missile system was unveiled at military oarade in Pyongyang April 15, 2012. This new missile was part of a massive display of ballistic missiles developed and manufactured by North Korea Defence Industry. The system uses a three-stage, liquid fueled propulsion system.

This missile has a takeoff weight of 45 tons, and capable of a ballistic flight over a distance of 7,500 km. The missile launcher system is mounted on a special 16 wheel (8 axles) truck carrier designed and maunfauctured in China.

     
This missile system was unveiled at military oarade in Pyongyang April 15, 2012. This new missile was part of a massive display of ballistic missiles developed and manufactured by North Korea Defence Industry. The system uses a three-stage, liquid fueled propulsion system.
Hwasong-13 short-range ballistic missile
     

In the late 1980s, North Korea has launched a programme to designe and maunuacture new medium range ballistic missile known as the Nodong series which ahas a rnage of 1,000 km, able to target Japan. The missile is based on the Scud-D design, but is 50% larger and has a more powerful engine.

No-Dong-A:

The No-Dong-A (also named No-Dong 1 or Rodong 1) is a medium range ballistic missile based on the technology of the Russian-made ballistic missile Scud-D.
This system was developed by the North Korean defence industry. A prototype was detected on a launch pad in May 1990.

The No-Dong-A missile has a range of approximately 1,000 - 1,300 km. The accuracy of the missile is believed to be 2,000 - 4,000 m CEP when deployed at maximum range.

No-Dong-B (BM-25 Musudan):

The No-Dong-B (BM-25 Musudan) is a medium range ground-to-ground ballistic missile based on the technology of the Russian-made ballistic missile Scud-C. The system was developed by the North Korean defence industry and was unveiled for the first time to the public during a military parade on 10 October 2010 celebrating the Korean Worker's Party's 65th anniversary.

Israeli intelligence believes they have a 2,500km range while the US Missile Defense Agency estimates they have a range of 3,200km; other sources put the upper limit at 4,000km.

     
The No-Dong-B (BM-25 Musudan) is a medium range ground-to-ground ballistic missile based on the technology of the Russian-made ballistic missile Scud-C. The system was developed by the North Korean defence industry and was unveiled for the first time to the public during a military parade on 10 October 2010 celebrating the Korean Worker's Party's 65th anniversary.
No-Dong-B medium range ballsitic missile
     
The next steps in North Korean missile development are the Taepodong-1 and Taepodong-2 (known as Paektusan in North Korea.

The Taepodongs are large liquid-fueled missiles. As currently configured, they are operated like space launchers, with long assembly times, and launched from fixed, above-ground launch pads.

A one ton payload of chemical or biological agent could have a much broader effect and the accuracy of the missile is far less critical. North Korea is known to have the ability to produce both chemical and biological agents.

Taepodong-1:

The Taepodong-1 also named Paektusan-1 in North Korea, is the the first local-made multi-stage missile. It has an estimated range of 2,200 km, but is understood to be even less accurate than the Nodong.

The Taepodong-1 has been test flown only once on 31 August 1998 as a space launcher; instead of a normal ballistic missile payload, the missile carried a third stage, probably solid fuel, that was meant to inject a small satellite into low Earth orbit.

Taepodong-2:

Estimates of the performance of the Taepodong-2 are much more speculative.

The Taepodong-2 - or Paektusan-2 - is also a two to three-stage ballistic missile, but is a significant advance on the Taepodong-1. Its range has been estimated at anything between 5,000-15,000km.

Before December 2012, Taepodong-2 and its technology had been flight tested three times, in 2006, 2009 and April 2012. It failed to perform on all these occasions.
     
The Taepodong-2 - or Paektusan-2 - is also a two to three-stage ballistic missile, but is a significant advance on the Taepodong-1. Its range has been estimated at anything between 5,000-15,000km.
Taepodong-2 intercontinental ballsitic missile
 

Cookies settings

×

Functional Cookies

This site uses cookies to ensure its proper functioning and cannot be deactivated from our systems. We don't use them not for advertising purposes. If these cookies are blocked, some parts of the site will not work.

Session

Please login to see yours activities!

Other cookies

This website uses a number of cookies to manage, for example: user sessions.