Dutch Army Organisation of Applied Scientific Research tests new systems to detect IEDs 0111122

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Army of Netherlands test new systems against IEDs

 
 
Thursday, November 1, 2012, 10:30 AM
 
Dutch Army Organisation of Applied Scientific Research tests new systems to detect IEDs.
This week, the Defence organisation and the Netherlands Organisation of Applied Scientific Research (TNO) experimented with new systems for detecting roadside bombs. The technology being tested is aimed at making the detection of IEDs quicker and safer than equipment currently in use, such as hand-held metal detectors. Representatives from NATO partners had also come to the De Vlasakkers exercise area near Amersfoort to exchange experiences and ideas on the subject.
     
This week, the Defence organisation and the Netherlands Organisation of Applied Scientific Research (TNO) experimented with new systems for detecting roadside bombs. The technology being tested is aimed at making the detection of IEDs quicker and safer than equipment currently in use, such as hand-held metal detectors. Representatives from NATO partners had also come to the De Vlasakkers exercise area near Amersfoort to exchange experiences and ideas on the subject.
A vehicle equipped with special IED detection technology carries out tests at De Vlasakkers exercise area. (Credit Photo: Netherlands Ministry of Defence)

     

Thursday, October 25, 2012, saw various route threat detection and clearance technologies tested. These technologies scan surfaced and unsurfaced roads for IEDs by using camera or laser systems that register changes in the environment that could point to the presence of IEDs.

Promising
Although developments are still at an early stage, Colonel Bernard Wulfse, Commander of Joint Taskforce Counter-IED, sees promising possibilities ahead. “In future, the delays owing to the IED threat and the risk run by military personnel while searching for IEDs could be reduced by use of these systems.”

Volume
The laser systems, developed by the armed forces of Canada and Sweden, register changes on the basis of volume. One big advantage is that, by using this system, suspect objects can be detected from a reasonably safe distance. Lasers are capable of recognising objects that deviate from the surrounding environment from a significant distance.

Structure
The camera systems are capable of registering structural changes, in the surface of a rough track for example. The main advantage of this is that the camera sees details that are invisible to the naked eye. Moreover, although an IED buried in the sand cannot be detected by the laser system, the camera system will be able to pick it up. A combination of the 2 systems gives the best results for detecting IEDs.

 

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