US Army Strykers Dragoon with 30mm cannon operational in Germany


On April 1, Sen. Rob Portman visited the 2nd Cavalry Regiment in Germany to see the first upgraded Stryker Dragoon produced by Lima’s Joint Systems Manufacturing Center (JSMC). “The troops are very pleased to have something that can go up against other armored vehicles,” Portman said. “They are very impressed by what we do in Lima.”


US Army Strykers with 30mm cannon operational in Germany

A Stryker ICV-Dragoon fires 30 mm rounds during a live-fire demonstration at Aberdeen Proving Ground (Maryland), Aug. 16, 2017 (Picture source: US Army)


The modernized Stryker ICV-Dragoon, produced at the Lima JSMC plant (Ohio), is an armored personnel carrier that has been upgraded with a remotely-operated 30-millimeter cannon and is capable of defending against potential tank threats. Portman said military officials approached him in 2015 with the need of such a vehicle to support forces in Europe. After doing research and talking with other legislators, he helped amend the 2016 defense budget to appropriate $371 million to fund research, development and procurement of 81 upgraded

The Stryker is a family of 8x8 chassis armored fighting vehicles derived from the wheeled armoured vehicle Canadian LAV III, which in turn was based on the Swiss Mowag Piranha III 8x8, and manufactured by General Dynamics Land Systems, in use by the U.S., Belgian and Iraqi armies, to name some.

The US army chose the Stryker to have the ability to deploy a brigade anywhere in the world within 96 hours, a division in 120 hours, and five divisions within 30 days. The Stryker M1126 ICV is the infantry armoured personnel carrier vehicle version. The vehicle carries a combat squad of 9 soldiers in the rear compartment. The acquisition of the 30mm cannon-equipped Strykers, which began in the fall of 2015, was a relatively quick process. It took about 15 months from the receipt of funds to the delivery of ICV-D prototypes, said Maj.Gen. David Bassett, program executive officer for the Army's ground combat systems.


 

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