M109A7 SPH Paladin 155mm Self-propelled howitzer
 
 
 
M109A7 155mm self-propelled howitzer technical data sheet specifications information description intelligence identification pictures photos images video information U.S. Army United States American defence industry military technology
 
Description
The M109A7 SPH Paladin 155mm Self-propelled howitzer is an upgraded version of the M109A6 Paladin. Like the earlier M109 models, the M109A7 Paladin is a fully tracked, self-propelled howitzer armored vehicle. The M109A7 Paladin configuration was achieved through modifications to earlier-built M109A2, A3 and A6 vehicle hulls and the introduction of an entirely new cab and cannon assembly. While the vehicle's cannon will remain unchanged, the M109A7 will sport a brand new chassis, engine, transmission, suspension, and steering system. These components are also found on the Army's Bradley Fighting Vehicles, thus increasing commonality and reducing logistical footprints and cost. Improved survivability is also a main line of effort in the upgrade program. The vehicle will also feature a new 600-volt on-board power system, which is designed to accommodate emerging technologies and future requirements, as well as current requirements like the Battlefield Network. The electronic gun drive system, which was developed for the cancelled Non-Line-of-Sight Cannon, NLOS-C, provides significant improvement to firing operations. Also, the on-board power system ensures the platform will have enough SWaP-C growth potential to last until 2050. The first prototype was revealed in 2007. Prototypes of the M109A7 began tests at U.S. Army Yuma Proving Ground (Arizona) in 2008 when the original concept demonstrator was brought out for testing. Formal developmental testing began after that. Until now, over 10,000 test rounds have been fired. In 2013, this artillery system was approved for production and a contract was issued to BAE Systems to upgrade first M109A6 systems to the M109A7 standard. The US Army has planned to obtain a fleet of 580 M109A7 howitzers and the same number of associated M992A3 armored ammunition support vehicles. In April 2014, U.S. Army has received the first delivery of the first low-rate initial production M109A7 Self-Propelled Howitzer. In May 2014, US Army inducts M109A7 into low-rate initial production In November 2015, The U.S. Army awarded BAE Systems a contract option worth $245.3 million to complete the low-rate initial production (LRIP) of the M109A7 self-propelled howitzer and M992A3 ammunition carrier.
 
Variants:
- Currently no variants
 
Technical Data
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Armament
The M109A7 SPH 155mm self-propelled howitzer is armed with a 39-calibre 155mm M284 cannon, which is fitted with an M182A1 gun mount, and has a range of 24km using unassisted rounds or 30km using assisted rounds. The projectile loading can be carried out using the full-stroke hydraulic system, or a semi-automatic loading system is optional. The M109A7 also incorporates select technologies from the Future Combat Systems 155mm NLOS-C (Non-Line-of-Sight Cannon), including modern electric gun drive systems to replace the current 1960s-era hydraulically-operated elevation and azimuth drives. The removal of the hydraulic systems saves the crew a tremendous amount of maintenance, and they retain manual backups for gun laying just in case. The M109A7 is able to fire the Excalibur Precision 155 mm Projectiles. It is a 155 mm, Global Positioning System (GPS)-guided, extended-range artillery projectile in use as the Army’s next-generation cannon artillery precision munitions. It provides improved fire support to the maneuver force commander, increases lethality and reduces collateral damage. The target, platform location and GPS-specific data are entered into the projectile’s mission computer through an Enhanced Portable Inductive Artillery Fuse Setter. Excalibur uses a jam-resistant internal GPS receiver to update the inertial navigation system, providing precision in-flight guidance and dramatically improving accuracy of less than 2 meters miss distance regardless of range. Excalibur has three fuse options (point-detonation, point-detonation-delay and height-of-burst) and is employable in all weather conditions an terrain. Excalibur’s capability allows for first round effects on target while simultaneously minimizing the number of rounds required to engage targets and minimizing collateral damage. A 12.7mm M2 machine gun is mounted on commander hatch on the top of the turret and can be optionally remote-controlled.
 
M109A7 155mm self-propelled howitzer technical data sheet specifications information description intelligence identification pictures photos images video information U.S. Army United States American defence industry military technology The M109A7 can be fitted with a remotely operated weapon station armed with a 12.7mm heavy machine gun.
Design and protection
The layout of the M109A7 SPH 155mm self-propelled howitzer is similar to to the M109 howitzers family with the driver at the front of the hull on the left, the power pack is to his right and the turret is at the rear. It has a crew of four including commander, driver, gunner and loader. The M109A7 artillery system is equipped with shoot and scoot capability to offer protection for the crew against counter battery fire. It is also fitted with an automatic fire extinguishing system (AFES), gunner protection kit (GPK) and an enhanced applied armour. Armor of this self-propelled howitzer provides protection against small arms fire and artillery shell splinters. Vehicle can be fitted with add-on armor kit, as well as underbelly armor kit for a higher level of protection. Turret is fitted with Kevlar anti-spall lining. Vehicle is fitted with NBC protection and automatic fire extinguishing systems.
Mobility
As the M109A6, the M109A7 SPH 155mm self-propelled howitzer is motorized with the Bradley Fighting Vehicle standard Cummins 600-hp engine. However, the shift to an electric turret included a major redesign of the vehicle’s power system, converting the 600 hp engine’s work into up to 70 kW of 600 volt/ 28 volt direct current for use by various on-board systems. The M109A7 torsion bar suspension either side consists of seven dual rubber-tired road wheels with the drive sprocket at the front and the idler at the rear. There are no track-return rollers. The power system’s modularity means that if any one of the motors inside fails, it can be replaced in the field within less than 15 minutes, using the same single part type. In concrete terms, it means the howitzer crew can handle the problem themselves and continue the mission, instead of withdrawing for repairs. The new M109A7 SPH uses some technologies, originally developed for the cancelled XM2001 Crusader and XM1203 NLOS-C self-propelled howitzers. Previous M109 upgrades hadn’t altered the M109's 1950s configuration. The new chassis are being fabricated & assembled with components from the M2/M3 Bradley IFV (e.g. engine, transmission, final drives, etc.), in order to create more commonality across America’s Heavy Brigade Combat teams. BAE Systems expects a growth in overall weight of less than 5%, but the combined effects of the new chassis and more robust drive components give Paladin PIM the ability to operate at higher weights than its current GVW maximum of about 39 tons/ 35.4 tones. The vehicle has a fuel storage capacity of 545l and ground clearance of 0.4m. It can ford at a maximum depth of 1.0m and cross trenches of 1.8m depth. The gradient and side slopes of the vehicle are 60% and 40% respectively.
Accessories
Standard equipment of the M109A7 SPH 155mm self-propelled howitzer includes NBC protection system, night vision and automatic fire extinguishing system. This howitzer is also equipped with a Blue Force Tracker capability to ensure situational awareness with other friendly forces. The new electric-gun drives and rammer components, as well as a microclimate air conditioning system, will be powered by the common modular power system utilizing a 600 volt onboard electrical system in the existing cab and cannon assembly. Each M109A7 self-propelled howitzer is escorted by associated M992A3 ammunition support vehicle. The M992A3 carries ammunition under armor and reloads the howitzer. This vehicle transfers ammunition to the self-propelled howitzer via conveyer. Reloading does not require for crew members to step outside the vehicle. Usually it takes place away from firing position in order to avoid counter-battery fire. First M992A2 vehicles will be disassembled and reassembled to M992A3 standard.
 
Specifications
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Armament
One 155mm M284 cannon with a MA182A1 gun mount and an automated loader, roof-mounted 12.7-mm heavy machine gun
Country users
United States
Designer Country
United States
Accessories
Automatic fire extinguishing system (AFES), gunner protection kit (GPK), enhanced applied armour, NBC
protection
Crew
4
Armor
All-welded aluminium chassis and Kevlar armour for the turret
a
Weight
35,380 kg
Speed
61 km/h maximum road speed
Range
322 km
a
a

Dimensions
Length: 9.70 m; Width: 3.90 m; Height: 3.70 m
 
Details View
 
M109A7 155mm self-propelled howitzer technical data sheet specifications information description intelligence identification pictures photos images video information U.S. Army United States American defence industry military technology
M109A7 155mm self-propelled howitzer technical data sheet specifications information description intelligence identification pictures photos images video information U.S. Army United States American defence industry military technology
   
M109A7 155mm self-propelled howitzer technical data sheet specifications information description intelligence identification pictures photos images video information U.S. Army United States American defence industry military technology
M109A7 155mm self-propelled howitzer technical data sheet specifications information description intelligence identification pictures photos images video information U.S. Army United States American defence industry military technology
 
Pictures - Video
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