Libyan army has taken delivery of 200 HMMWV Humvees from United States 3007131

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Defence & Security News - Libya

 
 
Tuesday, July 30, 2013 10:03 AM
 
Libyan army has taken delivery of 200 HMMWV Humvees from United States.
The Libyan Army has taken delivery of 200 High Mobility Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicles, commonly known as Humvees, for use in border patrol and security duties, as the country continues to rebuild and strengthen the armed forces against the backdrop of growing insecurity and the proliferation of militias and transnational jihadist groups. (Source DefenceWeb)
     
The Libyan Army has taken delivery of 200 High Mobility Multi-purpose Wheeled Vehicles, commonly known as Humvees, for use in border patrol and security duties, as the country continues to rebuild and strengthen the armed forces against the backdrop of growing insecurity and the proliferation of militias and transnational jihadist groups. (Source DefenceWeb)
Humvee HMMWV of United States Army
     

The delivery, which came as a donation from the US Army, also comes as the army struggles to secure the country's borders to prevent the free movement of arms dealers, terrorists and drug traffickers who took advantage of the security vacuum created by the fall of former ruler Colonel Muammar Gaddafi during the revolution in October 2011.

Libyan Army chiefs unveiled the armoured cars in Tripoli earlier this month, saying the country needs to boost its arsenal to improve the mobility of its border patrol units. The Humvees will be used by the Libyan Army border guards, according to the Libya Herald.

Last month, the Libyan Army ordered 300 BRDM and BVP-1 armoured vehicles from the Czech Republic and signed a deal for the refurbishment of a further 300 BDRM armoured personnel carriers already in service within the army.

Libya is pushing ahead with efforts to rebuild and re-equip its army with the help of international partners including France, Italy, Britain, the US, Czech Republic, Turkey and the United Arab Emirates, amongst others.

Internally, the army is battling various armed Islamist insurgent groups and former militias who refuse to give up the weapons they obtained while fighting in the revolution against Colonel Gaddafi in 2011.

 

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