Husky mine clearing vehicle enters in service with Turkish army to replace manual systems 0308131

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Defence & Security News - Turkey

 
 
Saturday, August 3, 2013 09:20 AM
 
Husky mine clearing vehicle enters in service with the Turkish army to replace manual systems.
The Turkish army has take delivery of four South African-made Husky vehicle-mounted mine detectors (VMMDs), officials here said. Husky is a mine-removal system developed by Dorbyl Rolling Stock Division of East Rand, Gauteng, South Africa.
     
The Turkish army has take delivery of four South African-made Husky vehicle-mounted mine detectors (VMMDs), officials here said. Husky is a mine-removal system developed by Dorbyl Rolling Stock Division of East Rand, Gauteng, South Africa.
Husky mine detection/clearing vehicle at AAD 2012, defense exhibition in Pretoria, South Africa.
     

Turkish officials said the delivery is part of a contract with the company for the off-the-shelf acquisition of the system, which will replace manual mine-detecting practice by the Turkish Army. The Turkish military also occasionally uses a remote-controlled mine-detection system developed by the country’s biggest defense firm, Aselsan.

Some of Turkey’s borders with neighboring countries, especially Syria, Iraq and Iran, have land mines.

Turkish officials declined to comment on when the contract had been signed or its price, but an industry source from a Turkish armored vehicles manufacturer said the deal was worth more than $100 million.

The Husky (also known as Chubby System) is a mine clearing wheeled protected vehicle designed and manufactured by the South African Company DCD Protected Mobility. The Chubby System or Husky is a distinct versatile sensor platform which has been deployed around the world since the 1980’s.

Suitable for use in both rural and urban environments, the Husky facilitates fast and efficient route clearance by creating safe passage for military convoys and civilian vehicles. When configured for mine/IED detection, a Husky can cover a 3-meter wide swath at 35 km/h, averaging about 200 km per day.

 

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